In Psalm 28:3 David prays: 

“Do not drag me off with the wicked, with the workers of evil, who speak peace with their neighbors while evil is in their hearts.” (Psalm 28:3 ESV)

What could David be talking about? Is it really possible to be dragged away with the wicked? It seems all too possible. Remember when Jesus was anointed at Bethany and Judas objected as follows?

“But Judas Iscariot, one of his disciples (he who was about to betray him), said, “Why was this ointment not sold for three hundred denarii and given to the poor?” He said this, not because he cared about the poor, but because he was a thief, and having charge of the moneybag he used to help himself to what was put into it.” (John 12:4–6 ESV)

Well, the disciples were taken away in the whole argument as recorded in Matthew 26:8 we read:

“And when the disciples saw it, they were indignant, saying, “Why this waste?” (Matthew 26:8 ESV)

How easy it is to get dragged away with the wicked, who speak peace with their neighbors while evil is in their hearts, without Scripture. Today we hear from wicked people their facidious concern for the environment and for the poor and for the supposedly underprivileged—all of which are shams that even the godly can get carried away with. A true care for these things will have appropriate actions, but the concern for these things by the wicked are hypocritical. The real intention of the wicked is to fight against the Lord and his people (Revelation 12). The Scriptures get to the heart of people like Judas. For as John said:

“He said this, not because he cared about the poor, but because he was a thief, and having charge of the moneybag he used to help himself to what was put into it.”

Behind the spoken concern for the environment, safety, the poor, the underprivileged, etc. can exist selfish and sinful hearts that really do not care at all. All of it can be a pretense. Knowing this, evidently as Scripture informs us, should be a good guard from getting dragged away with the wicked, with workers of evil who speak peace with their neighbors while evil is in their hearts. For remember, it was not just Judas who spoke these things, but the disciples who also became indignant over the matter. How easily can one be influenced by Judas’ mentality toward apparent waste—without Scripture. Scripture is a safe guard to our mouths speaking of concern when our hearts may be full of selfish-desire for other things. 

I recall the words from a novel I read recently called Ecochondriacs this phrase of one of the main characters named Helen who is described as follows:

“She told herself that it was the rigors of scientific inquiry that did her faith in, but it was actually the fact that she was looking for a wider scope for her passions and piques. She thought her loss of faith was intellectual, but it was almost entirely emotional.” (p.86)

She was looking for “a wider scope for her passions and piques.” So was Judas. So could all of the disciples. It’s easy to get dragged away with the talk—without Scripture. I am tempted at times to leave off from Scripture reading, but Scripture guards us from getting dragged away with the talk of the hypocrites whose concern is really a cover up for their evil hearts. The solution to an evil heart is a new regenerate one that comes only through Jesus Christ. Nonetheless, the purpose of my meditation here is simply to point out that Christians need Scripture. For unbeknownst to us all, we can be carried away so easily without it—even with regenerate hearts.


If one needs further proof of the matter, just consider our High Priest who believed that his disciples and all who would believe were elected in God and secure also prayed for “his own” the following:

“Sanctify them in the truth; your word is truth.” (John 17:17 ESV)

Added to this he was one who was dedicated to the same, though being God of very God,

“And for their sake I consecrate myself, that they also may be sanctified in truth.” (John 17:19 ESV)

It is indeed the Word of God that aids us in what the wicked fail to regard of God’s great works, regardless of how wasteful and non-essential as some may portray them (cf. Psalm 28:5).